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“A Spectrum on the Shelves: Building a Library Collection for People with Autism” – Targeting Autism Webinar, Sept. 17, 2019

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Jennifer Taggart

Assistant Department Head of Youth Services, Bloomfield Township Public Library (Michigan)
Accessibility Services Speaker & Consultant

As we conduct much needed diversity audits of the materials on our shelves, we need to be including materials for the neurodivergent community in this analysis. Attendees will gain awareness and a working knowledge of autism spectrum disorder along with common neurodevelopmental disorders that can coincide with autism.  In this interactive webinar, we will identify adaptive materials and multimedia geared to cognitive, motor, visual, auditory, sensory and social skills development.  Insight given on collaboration with autistic self-advocates, caregivers, special education professionals and rehabilitative therapists to help plan appropriate collection components. Attendees will also take away tips on processing, sustainability, and marketing.

Jen Taggart is Assistant Head of Youth Services and librarian responsible for the Youth Special Needs Collection  at the Bloomfield Township (MI) Public Library. She has presented on accessibility in library services and collection development nationally, in addition to creating the biennial Adaptive Umbrella Workshop for librarians working with people who have disabilities. She also co-developed the Special Needs Services Roundtable (SNSR) of Michigan librarians providing services for children, teens, and adults with disabilities and serves as programming chair of the Michigan Alliance for Cultural Accessibility (MACA). In 2009, Jen received the Michigan Library Association Children’s Services Division Award of Merit for her development of the Special Needs Collection and innovative youth programs and was named a Mover & Shaker by Library Journal in 2016. You can also find her blogging about inclusive services at Adaptive Umbrella 

This free webinar is open to all and will be held on Tuesday, September 17th, from 12:30-1:30pm (CST).  To enter the Adobe room at the time of the event, click: A Spectrum on the Shelves: Building a Library Collection for People with Autism

If you plan to attend the webinar, please click:  Suzanne Schriar ,  to send an email.  Include your name and name of library (if applicable). 

On the day of the webinar and prior to the start time, please test your connection at: http://webjunctionillinois.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

 

Check out NADD : an association for persons with developmental disabilities and mental health needs

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Thanks to Erin Miller, 2019 Targeting Autism Forum presenter, for alerting us to this wonderful organization and wealth of resources within.  The organization, NADD,  National Association for the Dually Diagnosed was founded in 1983 by Robert J. Fletcher, and was based on the following premise that individuals with both developmental disabilities and mental health issues remained unidentified, untreated and underserved.  NADD was established as a multidisciplinary association of professionals to promote the education of the professional community concerning the realities of dual disability so that the issues and problems can be successfully addressed.

A New Logo — A Symbol of Empowerment

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Yesterday, June 18th, in honor of Autism Pride Day, The Targeting Autism initiative changed its logo, replacing the puzzle pieces with the rainbow infinity symbol.  There was no better time than Autism Pride Day to change our branding by displaying the symbol that honors diversity with infinite variations and possibilities.New autism logo (2)

Autistic Activist, Archivist & Blogger, Steph Diorio, Inspires the Forum to Move Beyond Autism Awareness

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Steph Diorio, the local history librarian/archivist at the Hoboken Public Library was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome in 2009 and has been a tireless autism advocate ever since.  She speaks at conferences and blogs about the issues autistic people face including: (1) accessibility; (2) being infantilized/talked down to; (3) being taken seriously; and (4) being talked over by parents and “experts.”

Steph has been blogging and talking to all who would listen since 2010 in an attempt to support other autistic people and amplify their voices.   As both a passionate autism advocate and gamer, Steph started the Autistic Gaming Initiative , a group that provides a social outlet for autistic gamers, as well as, a vehicle to raise money for autism charities run by and for autistic people.

In answer to the question, “If I’m not autistic, how can I help autistic people I know,” Steph stresses the importance of listening to them.  If an autistic person tells you that a type of therapy, an organization or a societal expectation is harmful to autistic people, believe them!  She also urges us to reject the medical model that describes autism as a condition to be treated.  As Steph says, “We don’t “have” autism, we “are” autism.

Steph Diorio’s presentation slides can be viewed at the link below:

Steph Diorio Self-Advocacy In Your Community_ An Autistic’s Guide To Speaking Up And Speaking Out

Gyasi Burks-Abbott Shares His Personal & Professional Journey as Disabilities Self-Advocate

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Gyasi TA19 2Gyasi Burks-Abbott is a librarian, writer, public speaker, autism self-advocate and a fellow with Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disorders (LEND), a nationwide training program including 52 locations across the nation, designed to improve the health of infants, children and adolescents with disabilities.

In his talk on Autism and Civil Rights, Gyasi shares a timeline depicting the slow paradigm shift from a medical model of disability to a social model, and from institutionalization to community inclusion.

The beginning of this shift is evidenced in the 1970s, in the following timeline, as disability begins to be treated as a protected class in anti-discrimination legislation:

  • 1973 – Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in programs receiving federal funds.
  • 1975 – Education for All Handicapped Children Act (later renamed IDEA) mandates a free and appropriate public education for all disabled children.
  • 1990 – Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, public accommodations, and public services.
  • 1999 – US Supreme Court Olmstead Decision rules that unjustified segregation of people with disabilities constitutes discrimination in violation of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  • 2014 – Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Final Rule mandates that federal funds used for Home and Community Based Services must be in the most integrated setting.

Hurry – Register Now for the 2019 Targeting Autism Forum!!!

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There are some remaining seats for the 5th Annual Targeting Autism Forum, May 16 & 17, at Dominican University, River Forest IL.  Join us for an opportunity to network and learn about neurodiversity, civil rights and libraries from many nationally known experts and self-advocates.

Registration has been extended through April 19.  Email Suzanne Schriar for more information or to register.

Below are just a few of our speakers: